Math 3191 - Applied Linear Algebra

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Introduction

This is the homepage of the CU-Denver course Math 3191 - Applied Linear Algebra. The course is offered every semester. This homepage is being constructed during the Fall 1996 semester and will hopefully be available for use by all students taking this course now and in the future.

To access some features of this page you will need a password. I will give you a password in class after you have filled out a short introductory form. Please fill out this form now.


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Course Syllabus - Fall 1996

From the College Catalog : Designed primarily for students interested in applied mathematics, computer science, science, or engineering. Topics include solving systems of equations using Gaussian elimination with partial pivoting, LU-decompositio n of matrices, matrix algebra, determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and applications. Prereq: Math 1401

Text: H.Anton, Elementary Linear Algebra, 7th Ed., Wiley, 1994

(optional) B.Evans, J.Johnson, Linear Algebra with Derive , Wiley 1994

Exams: There will be three in-class exams (see schedule below) and an in-class comprehensive final. There will also be weekly quizzes covering definitions and simple computations.

Homework: Homework will be assigned daily. They will sometimes be collected and graded. When this occurs you will be told exactly which problems to hand in (a subset of the assignments). When homework is collected, we will forgo the weekly quiz. Homework will be assigned from both texts, but those from the Evans text will be given out in class as handouts.

Derive® : The computer program Derive® is available for use in the UCD Computer Labs. All students are strongly advised to use it for homework assignments, but it will not be available for exams. It is not my intention to examine you on your ability to use this program, but this may change if the department sets a different policy. When homework is collected and you have used Derive® to answer a question, the set-up, explanations and response are to be written out and the complete Derive® session (pertinent to the question) printed out and attached. [You may of course include the explanatory material in the print-out if you desire.]

Grades: Grades will be determined as follows:

              
               In-Class Exams      60%
               Final Exam          30%
               Homework & Quizzes  10%
I do not curve exam grades and grade on a standard scale A(90-100), B(80-89), C(70- 79), D(60-69), F(0-59). However, I do use plusses and minuses in final grades.

Extra Credit! - Don't bother asking, I don't believe in it.

Syllabus: I plan on covering most of chapters 1- 6 and 8 of the Anton book. A detailled syllabus with homework assignments will be handed out in class.

Dates:

Advice: There are several points I wish to make about taking this or any other math class.

1. You are no longer in high school. The great majority of you, not having done so already, will have to discard high school notions of teaching and learning and replace them by university-level notions. This may be difficult, but it must happen sooner or later, so sooner is better. Our goal is more than just getting you to reproduce what was told to you in the classroom.

2. Expect to have material covered at two to three times the pace of high school. Above that, we aim for greater command of the material, especially the ability to apply what you have learned to new situtations (when relevant).

3. Lecture time is at a premium, so it must be used efficiently. You cannot be "taught" everything in the classroom. It is your responsibility to learn the material. Most of this learning must take place outside the classroom. You should be willing to put in two hours outside the classroom for each hour of class.

4. The instructor's job is primarily to provide a framework, with some of the particulars, to guide you in doing your learning of the concepts and methods that comprise the material of the course. It is not to "program" you with isolated facts and problem types nor to monitor your progress.

5. You are expected to read the textbook for comprehension. It gives the detailed account of the material of the course. It also contains many examples of problems worked out, and these should be used to supplement those you see in the lecture. The textbook is not a novel, so the reading must often be slow-going and careful. However, there is a clear advantage that you can read it at your own pace. Use pencil and paper to work through the material and to fill in omitted steps.

6. As for when you engage the textbook, you have the following dichotomy:

a.[recommended for most students] Read for the first time the appropriate section(s) of the book before the material is presented in lecture. That is, come prepared for class. Then the faster paced college-style lecture will make more sense.

b. If you haven't looked at the book beforehand, try to pick up what you can from the lecture (absorb the general idea and/or take thorough notes) and count on sorting it out later while studying from the book outside of the class.


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Supplementary Material

In this section we will provide files of additional material presented to the class, in particular the material on the use of Derive® will be placed here.


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Homework Assignments

Homework Assignments

Date             Section                    Homework (Anton Text)

8/27             §1.1                  1-5, 7-9, 12
8/29             §1.2                  1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 17, 23(  ), 26
9/3              §1.3                  1, 3, 4, 7, 9, 17, 19, 20, 23, 24
9/5              §1.4                  1-4, 6, 7, 9, 11, 14, 17
9/10             §1.5                  1, 2, 6, 8, 11, 13
9/12             §1.6                  1, 2, 5, 8, 15, 17, 20, 25
9/17             §1.7                  1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 10, 11, 14, 15, 17, 19
9/19             §2.1                  1-3, 7, 9, 11, 13, 19
                     &2.2               1-3, 5, 9, 11, 13
9/24             §2.3                  1, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12
9/26             §2.4                  1-5, 9, 12, 13, 17, 21, 29
10/1             §3.1                  1a,e,i, 2a-e, 3-6, 8-10
                     &3.2               1-3, 6, 10
10/3             EXAM I
10/8             §4.1                  1-7, 9-11, 14-16, 21, 23, 26, 28, 30
10/10            §4.2                  1-4, 6-8, 11, 13, 15, 17, 20, 26
10/15            §4.3                  2a,c, 4, 5a,c, 6a,c, 10, 12a,d, 14, 21, 22
10/17            §5.1                  1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10, 15, 18
10/22            §5.2                  1b,c, 3b,d, 4b,e, 7, 9, 11, 13, 19
10/24            §5.3                  1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 11, 15
10/29            §5.4                  1-4, 7, 11, 13, 15, 18, 21
10/31          EXAM II
11/5             §5.5                  1a,d, 3a,b, 5a,b, 6b,c, 12, 14
11/7             §5.6                  1a,c,d, 4, 5, 9, 11
11/12            §6.1                  1, 4-6, 9, 13, 18-20, 24
11/14            §6.2                  1, 3-5, 8, 12, 14, 15, 18, 19
11/19            §6.3                  3-5, 7, 10, 16, 18, 22, 23
11/21            §6.4                  1,2,3,4,6
11/26          EXAM III
12/3             §8.1                  2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 13, 15, 17, 20, 27, 28
12/5             §8.2                  1-4, 7, 8, 10, 13, 15, 18, 21
12/10            §8.3                  1a,c,e, 2, 5, 7, 12, 13, 17, 18, 19
12/12            §8.4                  1-4, 7, 10, 12, 14
12/17          FINAL

Additional Assignments

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Homework Answers

In this section we will provide some homework answers a week after the assignments are made.


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In Class Quizzes

In this section we will provide a list of previous quizzes with answers.


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Exams

In this section we will provide files of the exams given in this course with answers.


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Statistics for the Class (Spring 1996)

We will provide averages and grade distributions for exams and quizzes here.

There are currently 28 students registered for this course.


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Announcements for Fall 1996

In this section I will store all class announcements for the semester.


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Last Updated September 24, 1996
http://www-math.cudenver.edu/~wcherowi